Master English Tenses-PRESENT SIMPLE

Present Simple

hourglass-2912968_960_720.jpg

The Form of Present Tense


Positive:

Add -s after the verb with he/ she/it.

For Example;

I/you/ we/they work for Ford.

He/she/it works really well.


Negative:

Use the auxiliary do / does + not + verb.

For Example;

He doesn’t work at the weekend.

I don’t work.


Exceptions

1) The verb be is irregular:

I am ⇔ I’m not

you / we / they are ⇔ you / we / they aren’t,

he / she / it is ⇔ he / she / it isn’t.

2) Verbs ending in consonant + -y (e.g. rely), change the -y to an -i and add –es.

For Example;

He/ she/it relies on financial support.

3) Verbs ending in –ch, -o, -s, -ch, -ss, and -x (e.g. reach), add -es.

For Example;

He/ she/it reaches new levels every day.


Questions

1) With be, put am / are / is first.

Are you Swedish?

2) With all other verbs, use do/does.

Does it cost a lot?

3) With question words (who, what, where, how, etc.), add do/does to the question word.

Where does he work? How do they get to work?

4) If the question word is the subject, do not use do/does.

Who works for a multinational?


We use the Present Simple to talk about:

• skills and abilities

For Example;

>She is an excellent communicator.
>He hasn’t got/doesn’t have strong analytical skills.

• daily routines

For Example;

>We go to the canteen for lunch.
>I don’t leave work before 7.00 p. m.

• facts and things that are generally true

For Example;

>Sales of these products tend to peak in June.
>Retail banks offer a lot of financial services.


👉We can also use the Present Simple with an adverb of frequency (always, sometimes, etc.) to talk about things that happen regularly. Frequency adverbs go before the main verb, but after be.

For Example;

>I often work at the weekends.
>She is never late for meetings.
>What do you normally do for lunch?

chart

 

 

Alfama Language Community 20180329_141838_0001 - Edited

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s